Is Money Ruining Football?

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Yo Kass Profile
Yo Kass answered
For many people (mainly Manchester City fans), increased investment in football is a wonderful thing. For others, all sporting competitiveness has been taken out of the game by an uneven financial playing field.

How does money effect football? To decide whether money is ruining football, I'd suggest looking at the role money plays in football overall. As much as we might hate it, sports and money are inseparable. There is no way that competitive sports would be able to continue to the level we enjoy them today without funding for facilities, training, wages and all the other overheads that running a football club incur.

On the other side of the coin, the pumping of too much money into football does has negative effects. Player and staff wages become inflated, the cost of running a football club soon spirals out of control, and financial gain becomes the main operating objective of a club (often at the cost of things like sportsmanship or community spirit).

Money and the ugly effects it can have on football The main qualms I have with the way money has effected football is in terms of player wages. Player wages for the 2011-12 Premier League season reached a record £1.6 billion pounds. This represents a 70% wages to revenue ratio, a figure that would be completely untenable in any other business.
High wages also eats away at the integrity of the game meaning that football has been ruined by money. Players are no longer loyal to their clubs, but act more like mercenaries constantly vying for a larger pay cheque.
The way big private investors and owners pump their own private funds into individual clubs makes the situation even worse. It means that teams like Manchester City or Paris Saint Germain are able to pay over the odds wages (sometimes in excess of £200,000 a week) to attract the most talented players. This leaves teams with more modest budgets picking up players from the 'leftovers pile'.
FIFA (the football governing body) will be implementing new 'financial fair play' regulations in the coming seasons, but personally I am sceptical that those in power will risk rocking a boat that has proved so profitable for them up till now.
Chris Beeby Profile
Chris Beeby answered
Since the introduction of SKY TV football has changed from our beloved game to a multi-million pound business some might say.
Football never used to be about money, it used to be about winning trophy's and medals - now of course there are many arguments to say this is no longer the case.
Greed of player wage demands are thought to be everywhere, with some players now being paid over 100k a week just to play football at a particular club.
SKY TV has pumped millions into the game, causing top players to get an increase in wages. We also have the fact of billionaires and millionaires taking over clubs such as Liverpool, Man Utd and Liverpool.
When it comes to a player signing a new contract we now see loyalty go out of the window it seems with players going where they can get the most in wages, The only cause of this happening is surely a result of SKY TV and rich owners of clubs paying whatever it takes to get their player.
With there being no cap on player wages we are seeing many problems in the modern day of football, which are:
* Loyalty of players is going, as top players will move where they can get more money.
* Top players pretty much holding their clubs to ransom, some clubs get into financial difficulty this way.
* The wage for players as a whole has gone up, thus making not so rich clubs struggle to survive.

The gap between the Premiership and Football League is getting massive, tens of millions of pounds separate the clubs now, this never used to be the case. Some might say this has become unfair competition.
Money that has been put into football mainly by SKY TV can only really benefit the top clubs in English football, leaving the rest struggling to survive - so there is a strong argument to say that the money situation in football which is literally now causing clubs to run like a business instead of what used to be a football team in the beautiful game is ruining football as we have known it.
william ridenour Profile
I am sorry to say that money can change every thing we feel to be morally correct. New players along with the old ones like this idea and feel they make much better lives for themselves. I know it's wrong but if you were actually in their place would you ask yourself the same question?

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